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Ten fascinating facts about WWT founder Sir Peter Scott

Ten fascinating facts about WWT founder Sir Peter Scott

Discover the fascinating story of Sir Peter Scott's life and learn about some of his more unusual achievements and passions, from his interest with the Loch Ness monster to the fish that shares his name.

Why WWT Slimbridge is called the birthplace of modern conservation

Why WWT Slimbridge is called the birthplace of modern conservation

On a bright December morning in 1945 two men watched a large flock of geese feeding on the banks of the river Severn in Gloucestershire. As they watched they noticed that the flock contained several different species of geese.

Rising temperatures are triggering changed responses in animal populations in the Arctic, new data shows

Rising temperatures are triggering changed responses in animal populations in the Arctic, new data shows

The Arctic is in the process of entering a new ecological phase, which potentially carries a huge cost for humanity. WWT have taken part in a global study to shed light on how climate change might be affecting high Arctic species.

Nights, camera, action! Device to record voyaging eels during hours of darkness installed at Gloucestershire reserve marking World Fish Migration Day

Nights, camera, action! Device to record voyaging eels during hours of darkness installed at Gloucestershire reserve marking World Fish Migration Day

A new acoustic camera has been fitted at WWT Slimbridge Wetland Centre to monitor eels embarking on their epic migratory voyage.

EU countries choose health over poison in historic vote to ban lead shot in wetlands

EU countries choose health over poison in historic vote to ban lead shot in wetlands

A huge leap towards ending the suffering of millions of waterbirds from lead poisoning has been taken following a momentous vote to ban lead shot in and around wetlands.

Welcome home! Black-tailed godwits return to WWT Welney

Welcome home! Black-tailed godwits return to WWT Welney

It seems that home really is where the heart is, even if you’re a black-tailed godwit. With good numbers already returning to Project Godwit sites this year, the future looks bright for these iconic waders.

UK crane population reaches its highest level for over 400 years

UK crane population reaches its highest level for over 400 years

Crane numbers are a 400-year high thanks to to a conservation partership between charities.

The alternative dawn chorus:  Ten quirky wetland bird calls to listen out for

The alternative dawn chorus: Ten quirky wetland bird calls to listen out for

Ten wonderfully quirky bird calls to listen out for around the UK's wetlands this spring time.

If we want to bring back farmland birds, restore a farmland pond, new research shows

If we want to bring back farmland birds, restore a farmland pond, new research shows

Researchers have shown that restored farmland ponds contained twice as many bird species and almost three times as many birds, compared to neighbouring unmanaged and overgrown ponds.

Protecting biodiversity at WWT Steart Marshes

Protecting biodiversity at WWT Steart Marshes

Life thrives in wetlands and by creating and managing habitats, we can improve an area's biodiversity. One of our shining examples of how we can do this on a grand scale is the Steart Marshes, a huge salt marsh reserve created in 2014.

Photography competition 2019 - the winners

Photography competition 2019 - the winners

The winner, runner ups and commended photos from the 2019 Waterlife photography competition.

Cambodia: the kingdom of wetlands

Cambodia: the kingdom of wetlands

Cambodia is one of the most wetland dependant countries in the world. More than 46% of its people live and work in wetlands and 80% of the population rely on them for food. Yet protecting wetlands in Cambodia is a complex and challenging issue.

Protecting Madagascar's wetlands: My Wild Life with Harison Andriambelo

Protecting Madagascar's wetlands: My Wild Life with Harison Andriambelo

Harison Andriambelo, WWT's Wetland Technical Advisor in Madagascar, writes about his love of wetlands and why it's so important that we recognise the importance and fragility of this habitat in Madagascar, as well as its forests.

Alien Plant Meets a Mighty Foe at Llanelli Wetland Centre

Alien Plant Meets a Mighty Foe at Llanelli Wetland Centre

In a first for Wales, a microscopic sap-sucking mite has been introduced in a bid to help control invasive Australian wetland plant Crassula that chokes up bodies of water and vastly out-competes our native plants.

Wild barnacle geese take climate action

Wild barnacle geese take climate action

2019 research has shown that migratory barnacle geese are actively adjusting their traditions to climate change, shifting their migration routes within the last 25 years.